cooking, Food, Writing

The Perfect Steak

Many people are frightened to cook steak at home because of the timings or have misconceptions as to how it should be cooked. I never used to cook steak at home for the first reason. As I’ve grown older, my passion for food and drink has grown. Ten years ago I would have been happy enough with a Chinese takeaway on a Friday or Saturday night, however, this is not the case now. One of the great things about not having kids is that you only have to think about what yourself and your partner want for dinner, not something that children will also eat. You can also be slightly more extravagant with food purchases – for example, thinking nothing of spending £7.00+ each on a steak from the supermarket! When buying steak, I always buy Ribeye as it has the best flavour due to the marbled fat.

I refuse to eat steak out now, if I do, I always regret it as it NEVER comes the way you asked for it! It’s so annoying! I consistently cook steak medium-rare. It’s always perfect and it’s because I have got my timings bang on. Nothing annoys me more when people moan about having no blood/redness in their steak – why are you having it then?  It totally ruins a perfectly good (and quite often expensive) piece of meat. PS it’s not actually blood that comes out when you rest it, but that’s another story. On Friday night I cooked steak and this time thought I would write about how to do it in case anyone out there was unsure or tentative about doing it themselves. I served mine with a homemade blue cheese sauce (I will put this recipe on a separate post).

Method:

  1. About 30 minutes before cooking, take the steaks out of the fridge and allow to get up to room temperature. Season with salt and pepper on both sides. Ribeye6.JPG
  2. Put a teaspoon of rapeseed oil in a frying pan and heat until extremely hot.
  3. When the pan is hot enough, place the steak in and cook on one side for 2 minutes, 30 seconds before turning over.
  4. Cook for the same amount of time on the other side. As the pan is so hot, the steak should have caramelized – particularly any fat.

    Ribeye8.JPG
    The hot pan ensures the fat on the steak caramelizes – even if fat does spit everywhere, it’s worth it. 
  5. After 5 minutes, rest the steak on a chopping board or plate. Ribeye10.JPG
  6. Cut into thick slices and I like to serve mine with asparagus, tomatoes and mushrooms, plus a homemade sauce!

Enjoy!

 

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